How To Geocache 101

Are you excited for the geocache contest, but don’t know how to start? Read on and get the run-down on this exciting activity.

In a nutshell: Geocaching is a treasure hunting game for people of all ages and skill levels. Participants look for hidden ‘caches’, or containers, using GPS coordinates. Geocaching is a worldwide game so caches could be hidden literally anywhere.

How to play: Geocaching is a large community, so you are best off going straight to geocaching.com and perusing their website. You’ll have access to a map, informational videos, and the official app that you can use to geocache.

The app is really user friendly, kind of like GoogleMaps. It’s free to use on the easy level, and you can search for geocaches according to your location. Once you click ‘start’ on a geocache, the compass will take you right there. There are also notes on what to expect, amenities and potential hazards. But you don’t have to use the app. GPS coordinates are available on the website for every cache listed. You can simply type them into your GPS or smartphone maps app.

Caches come in all shapes and sizes. The first cache I found was the size of my pinkie finger, magnetized to the back of a road sign! So this is a game for the observant eye.

When you’ve found a cache, there will be a paper log inside it for you to sign. You can sign this log and/or sign it electronically via the app! It is literally just a click of a button away. The goal for many geocachers is to get as many logged finds as possible – making it competitive.

Sometimes there are trinkets inside the caches or trackables (a trinket with a GPS trackable code linked to it). A general rule of thumb for geocachers is to leave behind something of equal value to what you took. If you take a trackable, you are responsible to pass it on to another cache. This is a fun way for geocachers to see how far their community spreads!

What makes Sunrise Corner’s geocache challenge different? There are 13 caches in the contest, but only 12 are listed on geocaching.com See our  downloadable poster for coordinates. Each cache is attached to a larger monument that is themed to its location, making them easy to find. It’s perfect for family. There are also trinkets in the cache, but these are for you to take – they don’t need replacing. The contest starts September 1, 2017 – but you can start geocache any time you want!

Troubleshooters:

The cache is damaged, wet or missing.

A. Contact the owner of the cache! There will always be contact information online or in the log.

B. Check your coordinates if it appears to be missing. The coordinates will sometimes only take you within a couple feet of the cache. If you don’t look around, you may never find a small cache.

C. If you’re a serious geocacher, you’ll probably have extra logs, pens and paper along with you to replenish an empty cache. It’s very appreciated when you do.

What if I’m not connected to the internet when I’m geocaching?

A. Geocaching.com’s app is quite functional out of service if you start geocaching in service. Of course, you’ll need to make sure you have data on your smartphone.

B. Invest in a GPS unit and enter the coordinates in manually.

How do I win the contest?

A. Sunrise Corner will give away a backpack to the first 100 people to find all 13 caches. All you have to do is take a picture of yourself and the monument and send all 13 to info@sunrisecornermb.ca (preferably all at once).

B. To enter the draw for the grand prize, post a picture of you and a monument on social media with our hashtag #sunrisegeocache. The draw will make place November 1, 2017

For more information about geocaching, watch this helpful video!

 

Be Wildlife Smart!

Sunrise Corner is abundant in wildlife such as Black Bears, wolves, coyotes, snapping turtles, birds of prey, racoons and more! Be wildlife smart this summer by following our wildlife guide:

black bear crossing driveway
Black Bear crossing driveway

1. Don’t corner or provoke. Wild animals will generally avoid humans if they aren’t provoked or cornered.

2. Talk, sing, and make noise when you walk through bear country. This makes them aware you’re coming so they can avoid you.

3. Walk, don’t run! Walk slowly away if faced by a wild animal.

4. When camping, don’t leave food in your tent. Instead, keep it in a vehicle or hang it high from a tree branch.

5. Don’t leave children unattended! There have been lots of bear sightings in Sunrise Corner. Stay safe and watch your kids.

6. Don’t try to touch, hold or interact with baby animals in the wild. This can cause the mother animal to reject her young.

7. Be calm. We share this area with the wildlife and can cohabitate peacefully.

 

Get Ready for Canada Day!

Canada will be 150 years old in less than a month!

Vlaasta Enns, 91, of Middlebro is showing off her creativity with her Canada-themed flowerbed and quilt!ideas for Canada Day

How are you planning to celebrate?

Attend Events!

South Junction – Fireworks

Canada Day events are popular ways to celebrate Canada’s birthday, with food stands,

fireworks and rodeos. This year, events are going to be over the top because we’ve hit 150! Plan on attending Canada Day in South Junction on

Vita Canada Day Rodeo

June 30th at 8:30 pm with local entertainment and fireworks! Then wake up bright and early for Vita’s Canada Day parade on July 1st. There will be kid’s activities, rodeo and much more!

Decorate Your Yard!

The RM of Stuartburn is holding a yard decorating contest for Canada Day this year! Deck those flowerbeds and hang your flags for cash prizes! To register your lawn call: 425-3218 or email: inquiries@rmofstuartburn.com

Cook Canadian

Celebrate with a full stomach by trying out some authentic Canadian recipes! Get your mouth watering with some homemade poutine or lobster mac n’ cheese. Use ingredients like pure maple syrup, bacon and beer!

Learn Our History

There’s nothing more celebratory than learning about our history. The Sprague and District Museum has an informative display on Canada and the RM of Piney’s role in the last 150 years. To learn more about Ukrainian culture in Canada, visit the Gardenton

Gardenton Museum
Ukrainian school house in Gardenton

Ukrainian Museum. Canada is rich in culture and heritage. Learn your local history!

sprague museum

 

Foraging Guide

Sunrise Corner is rich in wild edibles and usable plant life. If you come in the right season, you can find a plethora of berries, mushrooms and plants for your enjoyment.

For your safety and enjoyment, please refer to this guide when you forage:

  • Be respectful of private property and nature reserves
  • Share the edibles – don’t pick everything there is in the area
  • Be wild animal smart – there is lots of wildlife here!
  • Know the difference between edible and poisonous plants – buy a wild edibles guide!
  • Prepare your edibles safely – buy a preparation guide or take a workshop on preparing wild edibles

If you’re interested in learning more about foraging, consider taking a workshop by Prairie Shore Botanicals! For more information, visit www.psbotanicals.com

Not sure when to come? Here’s a seasonal guide to some popular wild edibles growing around Sunrise Corner:

  • Cattails can be harvested in early spring or fall
  • Morel mushrooms can be found in spring, once the dandelions begin to flower
  • Wintergreen berries should be picked before June
  • Blueberries, wild raspberries and Saskatoons start around July
  • Chokecherries ripen in early August
  • Lobster Mushrooms can be found in mid-summer
  • Hazelnuts are ready to harvest in August
  • Acorns can be harvested between August and October
  • Highbush Cranberries should be picked after a frost

These dates are not set in stone. Before you visit, ask around to see if the season has started!